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Rā 305 Rāhina 31 o Whiringa-ā-nuku

Love this message on the wall in Hamilton East

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Rā 304 Rātapu 30 o Whiringa-ā-nuku

A day out getting up high on the mighty maunga – Te Aroha.  I didn’t really intend going all the way to the top as I wasn’t sure if my hip would cope.  But by the time I got more than half way, it just didn’t seem appropriate to turn back without reaching the summit.  The views across the Waikato, north to Coromandel and along the Kaimais were stunning.

te-aroha-view

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Rā 301 Rāpare 27 o Whiringa-ā-nuku

Busy day which started of with interviews for the leader of the Community of Learning. Two very strong candidates and impressive presentations.  Hillcrest High had to be evacuated because of a bomb scare and eventually all kids were sent home while the bomb squad combed the building. Then we headed to Auckland with a car full to see Bill Bailey. I haven’t laughed so hard for a while – possibly since the last time we saw him! A very clever man.  And he tweeted my photo of him on stage!!

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Rā 300 Rāapa 26 o Whiringa-ā-nuku

The days sure are ticking by. Today was one of those “4 seasons in one day” sort of days. Typical Springtime.  There’s a pair of blackbirds that are busy building a nest in one of the trees in our garden. I see them hopping across the lawn with bits of twig and grass and foraging in the compost bin.  It’s too difficult to get a photo of them though so today’s pic is the sky darkening just before another downpour. 

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Rā 299 Rātu 25 o Whiringa-ā-nuku

I went to the Hillcrest High School Maori Achievement Awards Evening this evening. It was great to see so many young people being celebrated for their academic, sporting, cultural and community achievements. One of the guest speakers was Norm Hill, proud son of Rāhui Pokeka (Huntly – former capital of Aotearoa!) environmentalist, conservationist and humble man. He talked of the values his mother instilled in him and his six siblings as they grew up in a state house in Huntly one of which was humility.  He also talked of the responsibility of those in power to empower others to meet their potential.  He finished with this message which I think says it all. 

“Whāia te iti kahurangi, ki te tuohu koe, me he maunga teitei. Pursue excellence – should you stumble, let it be to a lofty mountain.”